History

If you require any additional information regarding the curriculum other than that stated below, Skills Booklets are available from the school office which show all the objectives that children will be taught in all year groups for each subject. These booklets will be sent out at the start of each academic year.

 Additionally, you can find the National Curriculum at https://www.gov.uk/national-curriculum/overview or ask for a copy from the school office.

 

History

At Key Stage 1 we teach children about how their parents and grandparents grew up and about the changes which have happened over recent years.  At Key Stage 2 we teach children about specific times in history, which are defined by the National Curriculum.

 

History involves children in trying to find out what happened in the past and about events of personal, national and international importance.  We teach children through first-hand experiences where possible, taking them to museums, old properties, or reconstructed villages, or bringing the past to life in school to help them to remember what they have been taught.

 

All children will develop:

  • an interest in the past
  • an appreciation of human hopes and achievements
  • an understanding of the values of our society
  • knowledge of the major events in history and how they have influenced the world
  • an awareness of chronology
  • an appreciation of the differences in the past and present, including differences in values and attitudes
  • a range of skills to interpret primary and secondary source material
  • the ability to distinguish between historical fact and interpretation.

 

History Skills          2016-17       Key Stage one (Y1/2)

·         Changes within living memory Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal aspects of change in national life

·         Events beyond living memory that are significant nationally or globally [for example, the Great Fire of London, the first aeroplane flight or events commemorated through festivals or anniversaries]

·         The lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements. Some should be used to compare aspects of life in different periods [for example, Elizabeth I and Queen Victoria, Christopher Columbus and Neil Armstrong, William Caxton and Tim Berners-Lee, Pieter Bruegel the Elder and LS Lowry, Rosa Parks and Emily Davison, Mary Seacole and/or Florence Nightingale and Edith Cavell]

   
       
         

History Skills 2016-17       Maple Class (Y3)

Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age

Examples (non-statutory)

This could include:

·         late Neolithic hunter-gatherers and early farmers, for example, Skara Brae

·         Bronze Age religion, technology and travel, for example, Stonehenge

Iron Age hill forts: tribal kingdoms, farming, art and culture

The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain 

Examples (non-statutory)

This could include:

·         Julius Caesar’s attempted invasion in 55-54 BC

·         the Roman Empire by AD 42 and the power of its army

·         successful invasion by Claudius and conquest, including Hadrian’s Wall

·         British resistance, for example, Boudica

·         ‘Romanisation’ of Britain: sites such as Caerwent and the impact of technology, culture and beliefs, including early Christianity

 

 

 

History Skills               Willow Class             2016-17

A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066

Examples (non-statutory)

·         the changing power of monarchs using case studies such as John, Anne and Victoria

·         changes in an aspect of social history, such as crime and punishment from the Anglo-Saxons to the present or leisure and entertainment in the 20th Century

·         the legacy of Greek or Roman culture (art, architecture or literature) on later periods in British history, including the present day

a significant turning point in British history, for example, the first railways or the Battle of Britain

The achievements of the earliest civilizations

an overview of where and when the first civilizations appeared and a depth study of one of the following: Ancient Sumer; The Indus Valley; Ancient Egypt; The Shang Dynasty of Ancient China

 

History Skills  Birch Class (Y6) 2016-17

A study of an aspect or theme in British history that extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066

Examples (non-statutory)

·         the changing power of monarchs using case studies such as John, Anne and Victoria

·         changes in an aspect of social history, such as crime and punishment from the Anglo-Saxons to the present or leisure and entertainment in the 20th Century

·         the legacy of Greek or Roman culture (art, architecture or literature) on later periods in British history, including the present day

a significant turning point in British history, for example, the first railways or the Battle of Britain

A non-European society that provides contrasts with British history

one study chosen from: early Islamic civilization, including a study of Baghdad c. AD 900; Mayan civilization c. AD 900; Benin (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300.

 

 

 

  • Christian value for September - Creation and Stewardship. The respect for Creation has faltered in the face of technological advances. What should we be doing now?

Strong Foundations
&High Expections